the problems of e-reading, revisited

My hunch, for what it’s worth, is that it is indeed “the physicality of the printed page” that makes a significant difference — in a couple of specific senses.

First of all, the stability of the text on a printed page allows us (as most readers know) to have visual memories of where passages are located: we see the page quadratically, as it were, divided into upper left, lower left, upper right, and lower right. This has mnemonic value.

Second, the three-dimensionality of a book allows us to connect certain passages with places in the book: when we’re near the beginning of a book, we’re getting haptic confirmation of that through the thinness on one side and thickness on the other, and as we progress in our reading the object in our hands is continually providing us with information that supplements what’s happening on the page.

A codex is then an informationally richer environment than an e-reader.

This is is exactly why I use physical textbooks vs pdf versions. With a physical book, I can remember where in the text particular principles were introduced. If I could just get a search function to work on a physical book….

(Source: azspot)

WTF? I thought I bombed this Econ midterm. I was just praying the score wasn’t below a 70.
BIZZARRE.

WTF? I thought I bombed this Econ midterm. I was just praying the score wasn’t below a 70.
BIZZARRE.

Mr. Banana, just chillin’ outside Royce Hall.

Mr. Banana, just chillin’ outside Royce Hall.

Hey everyone, meet Selina Portera. A new fellow Bruin!

I’m a 35 year-old transfer student starting at the end of this month. UCLA became my dream school as a child, and for much of my 20’s I had given up on my dream. I had a turbulent adolescence and in order to financially support myself and my young child (without any help), I opted to work a series of comfortably paying dead-end jobs. 
In my late twenties I was married with a second child on the way. When my second child was born I was laid off from my job which was one of the best things that could have happened. This gave me back my time which I took advantage of and I went back to school. 
My community college gave me the opportunity to accomplish goals I had set for myself when I was younger. 
Years later I’m finally in a place I had only dreamed of. I’m starting the Transfer Summer Program in about two weeks and I am so excited and scared at the same time. I feel like I will stick out like a sore thumb because of my age, but it is the same way I felt when I started at my community college. 
I cannot wait to see what lies ahead for me!
Hey everyone, meet Selina Portera. A new fellow Bruin!
I’m a 35 year-old transfer student starting at the end of this month. UCLA became my dream school as a child, and for much of my 20’s I had given up on my dream. I had a turbulent adolescence and in order to financially support myself and my young child (without any help), I opted to work a series of comfortably paying dead-end jobs. 

In my late twenties I was married with a second child on the way. When my second child was born I was laid off from my job which was one of the best things that could have happened. This gave me back my time which I took advantage of and I went back to school. 

My community college gave me the opportunity to accomplish goals I had set for myself when I was younger. 

Years later I’m finally in a place I had only dreamed of. I’m starting the Transfer Summer Program in about two weeks and I am so excited and scared at the same time. I feel like I will stick out like a sore thumb because of my age, but it is the same way I felt when I started at my community college. 

I cannot wait to see what lies ahead for me!
Cheatsheet, MATH61, classmate.
(This classmate got 100% on the midterm I failed. She’s awesome, no?)

Cheatsheet, MATH61, classmate.

(This classmate got 100% on the midterm I failed. She’s awesome, no?)

Cheatsheet, MATH61, classmate

So, I last told you about some bad aspects of my summer so far. Want to tell you about something good.
Remember when I told you that it looked like I’d missed making the Dean’s List by a tiny margin? Well, apparently that point shortage didn’t matter, cause I actually made the list again last quarter. Yeay. I don’t know if anyone will ever care or that any future employer or VC will give a shit that I’ll have that on my resume, but it’s a nice cookie to get for the quarter’s hard work.

So, I last told you about some bad aspects of my summer so far. Want to tell you about something good.

Remember when I told you that it looked like I’d missed making the Dean’s List by a tiny margin? Well, apparently that point shortage didn’t matter, cause I actually made the list again last quarter. Yeay. I don’t know if anyone will ever care or that any future employer or VC will give a shit that I’ll have that on my resume, but it’s a nice cookie to get for the quarter’s hard work.

About 50% of my classmates have phones with shattered glass screens. It’s ironic that the technology is advanced enough that the touch-capacity of these phones is still completely intact, but not advanced enough to create a display glass that won’t shatter.

nonlocalrelation:

"Because ‘what if’ never went to the arena."

"The person with the greatest perseverance (is the one) that wins.Always willing to get up and go at it again…

(Take) a picture of yourself on day one. That’s who you’ll never be again. Record where you’ve been. When the struggle gets hard you go back to that day and (look).”

Bummer Summer

pedanticromantic:

getacollegelife:

I just couldn’t do it.

I was taking MATH61 and ECON11 during the summer session, thought I would just “bang those out” and make my summer “productive”, and I couldn’t do it.
I found the pace of the summer session impossible for a class like MATH61. I was dedicating every waking hour to the…

I admire you for doing this hard thing! It takes wisdom and self-acceptance to know our limits. Plus, if you still try to absorb the material, you’re going to KILL IT next time you take it!

You guys are nice.